Anti Plagiarism

28 September 2011

Koko Krunch

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One of the most popular brand of cereals here in the Philippines is Koko Krunch, chocolate cereals from Nestle.

It's not only popular among the younger generation, but even with adults who like to have some chocolate crunchy but at the same time healthy snack inside their food keepers.

Brightest Blessings!

Halie



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25 September 2011

Reviews for Bloggers

I've come across this website and it looks really promising!

It offers a great resource for sponsored reviews so that we can all earn a little extra from doing the thing that we love to do - writing and blogging.

Find all these by visiting:

Advertise on blogs


Advertise with my Blog

Brightest Blessings!

Halie


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23 September 2011

Uncle Cheffy | Affordable Global Cuisine

This is review is posted quite late. Hubby and I dined at Uncle Cheffy sometime July. Here are the details.

Uncle Cheffy
Ground Floor
Ali Mall Phase 1, Araneta Center, Cubao, Quezon City
Telephone Number: 02 709-4104
Telefax: 02 709-4105

What did we have?

For starters, we had the Medium Crazy Bacon and Garlic panizza (Php 195)

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What can I say about the panizza?

Definitely worth every penny, in this case centavo! It was thin, crunchy, doesn't taste like uncooked dough. What really made it special are those little servings of fresh vegetables and the different sauces that came with it.

It was a great starter while we were waiting for the Back Ribs which came in about 5 minutes after the panizza was served.

And for our main meal, we had the Memphis Barbeque U.S Beef Back Ribs (Medium Php 300)

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We didn't eat rice that day, we settled for the back ribs with some fresh veggies and marbled potatoes. Those marble potatoes were very flavorful. The meat was tender and juicy. When compared to other similar dishes, this one wasn't sweet and although it may look burnt, it definitely wasn't. For the price, the panizza and back ribs were more than enough to satisfy our gastronomic cravings that day.

Our total bill: Php 529.39 (for a medium panizza, a medium serving of the back ribs and 2 glasses of chilled fruit juices)

Value for money: For the size of the servings, it was affordable. Uncle Cheffy dishes come in two sizes, Medium and Family. They also serve platters which serves 4 to 5 people.
Ambiance: Even if it was located in Ali Mall near one of the busiest streets in the Araneta Center, it was quiet and a gave a sense of privacy for the diners.
Service: The crew members were fast and efficient
Taste of the Food: Very good, we would be going back there when time permits.

If you want to get a taste of Uncle Cheffy's dishes, you can find them here:

Uncle Cheffy 1, Unit A216 and 201 Level 2,
Eastwood Mall, Eastwood Cyberpark, Eastwood City, Libis, Quezon City
Tel: 02 383-7215
Telefax: 02 470-2750

Uncle Cheffy 2
Unit C Bellagio II Forbes Town Center,
Rizal Drive corner Burgos Circle
Bonifacio Global City, Taguig 
Tel: 02 659-8030
Telefax: 02 659-8031

Uncle Cheffy 4
At Solenad, Nuvali Sta. Rosa, Laguna
Tel: 502-5968
Telefax: 502-5970

Uncle Cheffy is another concept by: Chefs' Quarter. If you may remember, I posted two reviews of Chefs' Quarter sometime last June.

FTFBadge     

Brightest Blessings!

Halie



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15 September 2011

Enhancing Your Food Photos

Please allow me to share something different this Friday to you guys.

It's so nice to see good looking food photographs. Restaurants and other food service industries rely on the quality of their photos to draw in customers. I mean, we have to admit it, if something does not look appetizing on photos would we even dare to try eating it? Personally, I wouldn't.

If you have a food blog, how do you expect people to look at your recipes or your food reviews if you do not have decent photos?

Here's a tip on enhancing your photos visually to make it more appealing to your readers.

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One thing that I do not want to see on food photos is a representation of a plate of some greasy, oily fried food.

What can you do to make your fried food look appetizing without making it look like it's swimming in oil? 

> Try to take a photo of your fried food after you take it out of the frying pan. The oil that's clinging on to the surface of your food has not yet dried up so it would still show in  your photos. 

> If you can't avoid taking a photo of your fried food after a few minutes, you may want to drizzle your food with some dressing and sprinkle it with a dash of some fresh herbs.

> Plate your food in a manner that would show some contrast in colors, height and texture. Avoid making your food look so flat.

> Angles, angles and angles. Take photos of your food from different angles and camera positions.

> Lighting and white balance, check them both. You don't want your photos to look pale, cold and stale. Check your light source and see if your white balance settings are appropriate. Try to take the settings out of auto and experiment until you get a more natural looking photograph.

> And lastly when it comes to post processing, remember that when it comes to food photos, less is more. Avoid too much contrast boost, color saturation and things that you may experiment with on other photos. Make it look more natural.

FTFBadge     






Brightest Blessings!

Halie




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14 September 2011

Cool Trivia | Ice

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Photo Source 

Ice is now mechanically produced on an large scale, but before refrigeration was developed ice was harvested from natural sources for human use.
Ice harvesting

Ice has long been valued as a means of cooling. Until recently, the Hungarian Parliament building used ice harvested in the winter from Lake Balaton for air conditioning. Icehouses were used to store ice formed in the winter, to make ice available all year long, and early refrigerators were known as iceboxes, because they had a block of ice in them. In many cities, it was not unusual to have a regular ice delivery service during the summer.

In 400 BC Iran, Persian engineers had already mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert. The ice was brought in during the winters from nearby mountains in bulk amounts, and stored in specially designed, naturally cooled refrigerators, called yakhchal (meaning ice storage).
There were thriving industries in the 16/17th century in UK whereby low lying areas along the River Thames estuary were flooded during the winter, and ice harvested in carts and stored inter-seasonally in insulated wooden houses as a provision to an Icehouse often located in large country houses, and widely used to keep fish fresh when caught in distant waters. This was copied from the Chinese who had been doing it for thousands of years. This was reportedly copied by an Englishman who had seen the same activity in China.
Commercial production

Ice is now produced on an industrial scale, for uses including food storage and processing, chemical manufacturing, concrete mixing and curing, and consumer or packaged ice. Most commercial ice makers produce three basic types of fragmentary ice: flake, tubular and plate, using a variety of techniques. Large batch ice makers can produce up to 75 tons of ice per day.
Ice production is a large business; in 2002, there were 426 commercial ice-making companies in the United States, with a combined value of shipments of $595,487,000.
For small-scale ice production, many modern home refrigerators can also make ice with a built in icemaker, which will typically make ice cubes or crushed ice. Stand-alone icemaker units that make ice cubes are often called ice machines.
Uses
Sports
Ice also plays a central role in winter recreation and in many sports such as ice skating, tour skating, ice hockey, ice fishing, ice climbing, curling, broomball and sled racing on bobsled, luge and skeleton. Many of the different sports played on ice get international attention every four years during the Winter Olympic Games.
Other uses
Ice cubes or crushed ice can be used to cool drinks. As the ice melts, it absorbs heat and keeps the drink near 0 °C (32 °F).
Ice can be used to reduce swelling (by decreasing blood flow) and pain by pressing it against an area of the body.
Structures and ice sculptures are built out of large chunks of ice. The structures are mostly ornamental (as in the case with ice castles), and not practical for long-term habitation. Ice hotels exist on a seasonal basis in a few cold areas. Igloos are another example of a temporary structure, made primarily from snow.
During World War II, Project Habbakuk was a British programme which investigated the use of pykrete (wood fibers mixed with ice) as a possible material for warships, especially aircraft carriers, due to the ease with which a large deck could be constructed, but the idea was given up when there were not enough funds for construction of a prototype.
SOURCE

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Brightest Blessings!

Halie




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07 September 2011

Hamburger Trivia and a Quote

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An entry for ABC Wednesday


This hamburger was really delicious, but here are some facts about this sinfully delicious sandwich:



  • The Big Mac was introduced in 1968. The price was 49 cents.
  • In 1999 there were more than 25,000 McDonald's in 115 countries.
  • Burgers account for 40% of all sandwiches sold. (2001)
  • 8.2 Billion burgers were served in commercial restaurants in 2001.
  • 65% of all hamburgers and cheeseburgers are consumed away from home. (2001)
  • The biggest hamburger ever served weighed 8,266 lbs. It was cooked in 2001 at the Burger Fest in Seymour, Wisconsin. Hungry hamburger fans can visit Seymour, the "Home of the Hamburger" and site of the Hamburger Hall of Fame, paying tribute to hamburger inventor Charles Nagreen. According to local legend, Nagreen served the first burger in 1885 at the Outagamie County Fair.
  • Another large hamburger was made in Rutland, North Dakota. In 1982 the town made what was then the World's Largest Hamburger, 3,591 pounds, which was consumed by some 8,000 people.
  • Denny's Beer Barrel Pub in Clearfield, Pennsylvania has offered a 6 pound hamburger, named Ye Olde 96er (6 pounds = 96 ounces) since 1998. It comes garnished with 2 whole tomatoes, 1/2 head of lettuce, 12 slices of American cheese, a cup of peppers, 2 whole onions, plus large quantities of mayonnaise, ketchup and mustard. No one has been able to finish one.
  • The Hamburger hall of fame is located in Seymour, Wisconsin. (SOURCE)


Brightest Blessings!

Halie


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